Tag-Archive for ◊ ice cream maker ◊

01 Jun 2013 Lemon Ice Cream

lemon ice cream closer

Bet you’ve never had Lemon Ice Cream!  Not lemon sorbet, or lemon sherbet, or lemon granita  or lemon frozen yogurt,  but lemon ice cream–creamy, rich, sweet, intense  lemon ice cream. Intrigued?  Tempted? I hope so, because I have a simple, oh-so-good recipe for you.  You do have an ice cream maker, right?  I use a “frozen bowl” ice cream maker, which seem to be everywhere for $40-$50 now, but sometimes you can get lucky.  This weekend my friend Sharon bought one at a garage sale for $5, and I saw one at  Savers for $12.99.

Homemade ice cream is very, very rich, and Lemon Ice Cream is no exception.  Serve small scoops (with an option for seconds, of course).  This recipe makes a quart of ice cream, richer and more filling than even the most premium commercial ice creams.  One quart of this ice cream will serve as many people as a half gallon of that store bought stuff.

I like to serve this ice cream on fruit pie, crisps and cobblers. My friend Sharon, whom I mentioned above, bought her ice cream maker after I fed her berry crisp with a scoop of this lemon ice cream.  This ice cream is also fantastic as a filling for an ice-cream sandwich.  To make a truly gourmet ice cream sandwich place a small scoop of Lemon Ice Cream between two ginger cookies, squish the sandwich a bit, square the filling up a bit, maybe roll the sides in a bit of chopped chocolate-milk, semi-sweet or white, then put the little bites of heaven in the freezer to firm up.   My pregnant daughter likes to eat  Lemon Ice Cream “as is” straight from a glass bowl with a long spoon.  She downed the sample above in one breath (at 9 o’clock in the morning one week before her due date!).

This recipe was first published in Gourmet magazine in 1999.  I’ve been making it since May 25, 2003.  Yes, I marked the date on my copy of the recipe, with this note, “Delicious and simple!”  “Simple” was written in caps and underlined twice!

Lemon Ice Cream

1 large lemon (zest plus 1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice)

1 cup granulated sugar

1 cup cold milk (I usually only have 2% at home, so that’s what I use)

1 cup well chilled heavy cream

 

With a vegetable peeler or microplane remove the zest from the lemon, do NOT include any of that bitter white pith in with the zest.  Put the sugar and the lemon peel in a food processor or blender and whirl until the sugar is finely ground and the lemon zest has been incorporated into the sugar. Add in the milk and the cream (On occasion, I have used 2 cups half-and-half instead of the milk and cream mixture).  Blend just to combine.  Stir in 1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice.  Process in ice cream maker for about 20 minutes.  Place soft ice cream in a freezer safe bowl, and set in freezer to harden up a bit (a few hours).  Ice Cream will keep at least a week, if not more, in the freezer but I doubt you will have to test the outer limits.

Thanks for stopping by my kitchen today!  Looks like the next few days are going to be scorchers.  Stay cool. Squeeze lemons. Make ice cream. By the way, I think the picture above is one of the best so far for this blog.  My webmaster, Ratty, fixed it up real nice, didn’t she?

21 Nov 2010 Cinnamon Ice Cream

I had heard about cinnamon ice cream a year or so ago and was instantly intrigued.  It sounded lovely.  Odd, but lovely, and I had a feeling–foodie intuition, if I may be so bold–that Cinnamon Ice Cream would be the perfect side kick for warm apple, peach and pear pies, crisps and cobblers. It took me awhile to find a recipe because I don’t like eggs in my ice cream.  I like Philadelphia style ice cream; ice cream made with milk, cream, sugar, and flavorings only.  No eggs.  Ever. I finally found this recipe.  It looks like it’s made its rounds!  No wonder it took awhile to get to me. I found it on Erin’s Food Files , who found it in Elizabeth Faulkner’s Demolition Desserts, who saw it on the Martha Stewart Show!

I don’t think this is the right ice cream for an ice cream cone or an ice cream sundae. It’s much too rich, and it’s cinnamon. There are no chocolate chips nor caramel swirls nor candied nuts in this ice cream, just cinnamon.  Who wants that on a cone? So why do I have this ice cream pictured in a sundae glass?  LOL.  Ooops.  Sometimes I really ought to think things through!  BTW,  Ben&Jerry’s does have a Cinnamon Bun ice cream out now, so some folk might think differently than I do.  Some folk might like Cinnamon ice cream plain, in a sundae glass or on a cone.  That being said, this ice cream is magic on warm fruit and nut based desserts.  Magic.

I am pretty sure someone will be shot if there is none of this left for our Thanksgiving pies.  I made a double batch, so that had better be.

Cinnamon Ice Cream

2 cups whole milk
1/2 cup Sugar-in-the-Raw (turbinado sugar)
1/2 cup pure maple syrup (Grade B if you can find it, the taste is more assertive)
2 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
2 cups heavy cream
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon Kosher salt

Directions:

Combine the milk, sugar, maple syrup, and cinnamon in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, until mixture just begins to bubble and sugar has dissolved, 6 to 8 minutes. Add cream, vanilla, and salt; stir to combine.  Pour into a bowl and set aside to cool, stirring occasionally. Cover and transfer to refrigerator to chill thoroughly, at least 1 hour and up to overnight.

Stir mixture briefly; pour into an ice-cream maker and process according to manufacturer’s instructions. Store ice cream in a covered container in the freezer, at least 1 hour and up to 1 week.

Serve over warm fruit pie, crisp, or cobbler.

GREAT day to stop by my kitchen today!  I think this recipe is going to transform your “This is GREAT!” fall desserts into your “OHMYGOD this is INCREDIBLE!” fall desserts 🙂
Let me know the reactions from your guests!!!

11 Nov 2010 Pumpkin-Maple-Pecan Sundaes

I saw a Maple-Pecan-Bacon Sundae in last month’s issue of Bon Appetite.  I’d heard about bacon brownies and bacon cookies and bacon cupcakes and I was ready to be on the cutting edge with Bacon Sundaes.  With a friend coming over for lunch,  I was ready for some taste testing. We were prepared for a drop-dead wonderful taste sensation.  I warmed the sauce, poured it over two flavors of ice cream (vanilla and coffee), and set the sundaes down. We tasted. I looked at her.  She looked at me.  We tasted again.  We shook our heads.  We tried it one more time. “Nooooooooo”, I said.  “Nooooooooo”, she said.

It just didn’t work. Bacon does not belong on ice cream.  Nope.  Not ever. The bacon was like a cold gummy bear, all texture, little flavor.  What salt kick did come, came after the chewing was over, and by that time the sauce and the ice cream had been swallowed.  The dessert just didn’t work.  But it had potential. We liked the sauce. We liked it over the coffee ice cream best, but still it wasn’t quite right.

I tinkered a bit more, and this is what I came up with… the warm Maple-Pecan Sauce (minus the bacon), drizzled over homemade Pumpkin ice-cream, and topped with a bit of bourbon whipped cream. Now here’s a nice dessert alternative for Thanksgiving, or an nice ending to any fall meal!

Just a note:  Pumpkin ice cream has a bit of a grainy texture (ALL pumpkin ice cream has this issue, unless it has been made with pumpkin flavoring rather than pumpkin puree), but with the sauce and the whipped cream, it’s not so noticeable and the pumpkin flavor goes fabulously well with the maple, the pecans, and the bourbon.  Mmmmmmmm 🙂  I taste tested pumpkin ice creams, too.  This one’s the best.

Maple Pumpkin Pecan Sundaes

with Bourbon Whipped Cream

Pumpkin Ice Cream

2 cups whipping cream (35%)
1 cup whole milk
½ cup sugar
1 ½ tsp ground cinnamon
½ tsp nutmeg
½ tsp ground ginger
½ tsp pumpkin pie spice
½ tsp ground allspice
1/8 tsp salt
½ tsp vanilla
1 cup pumpkin puree

  1. Gently heat the cream, milk, sugar, spices and salt over medium heat until the sugar has dissolved and bubbles form around the edge of the pan.
  2. Stir warm cream into the pumpkin along with the vanilla.
  3. Chill the mixture in the refrigerator until cold.
  4. Freeze in an ice cream maker according to manufacturer’s instructions.

I found this recipe at Christie’s Corner.

Maple-Pecan Sauce

¾ cup Grade B Maple Syrup
2 cinnamon sticks, broken in half
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon finely chopped crystallized ginger (I used Australian crystallized ginger, it’s very soft)
½ cup pecan halves

  1. Combine maple syrup and cinnamon in medium saucepan. Bring to boil over medium high heat.  Reduce heat to medium and simmer until sauce is thickened and reduced to ½ – 2/3 cup, about 5 minutes.
  2. Remove sauce from heat.  Discard cinnamon sticks.  Stir in lemon juice, chopped ginger and pecan halves.  Can be made 2 hours ahead.  Let sit at room temperature and then reheat slightly to serve.
  3. Spoon warm sauce over scoops of pumpkin ice cream. Serve immediately with a bit of Bourbon Whipped Cream, if desired.

I found the inspiration for these sundaes at Epicurious. The original recipe had diced maple glazed bacon in the sauce but just. say. “NO”!

Bourbon Whipped Cream

1 cup whipping cream
1-2 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon bourbon

  1. Whip with electric mixer until creamy.

Thanks for stopping by my kitchen today. Happy Fall!

10 Jul 2010 Andes Mint Chip Ice Cream

You know I couldn’t make just one, didn’t you?! Here’s ANOTHER really, really good Philadelphia Style ice cream. Philadelphia Style ice cream is, without a doubt, my choice for ice cream. It tastes lighter and it’s sooooo much simpler to make. I have fond memories of Andes Mint Chip Ice Cream. I have only know of one place that made it, and it went out of business years ago. When I was pregnant with Hannah, 26 years ago, I used to take a walk to this ice cream shop…, on a regular basis…, the cool Andes mint and the cold ice cream just seemed RIGHT! How exciting that I can make this at home now and I don’t have to be pregnant to enjoy it!

I found this recipe, and only modified it a little bit, at serving-ice-cream.com

Andes Mint Chip Ice Cream

1 ¼ cups cold whole milk (or 2%, 1%, or non-fat…remembering that each step down in fat content will affect the creaminess/iciness of the finished product)
2 ½ cups cold heavy whipping cream (or half-and-half)
1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoons peppermint extract (don’t even think of increasing this.  I did a few times and the ice cream base got bitter)
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
few drops of green food coloring, optional
1 box (4.67 oz.) Andes mints, coarsely chopped
½ cup mini chocolate chips OR ½ cup of chopped milk, dark, or mint chocolate

Stir milk, cream and sugar together, using a wire whisk or hand mixer, until sugar has dissolved. Stir in peppermint extract and optional green food coloring. Pour mixture into an electric ice cream maker. Process for about 15-20 minutes, or until mixture is very thick and slushy. Stir in all of the chopped mints and chocolate. Process for an additional 5 minutes. Remove ice cream to a freezer safe container and freeze until hard, two to four hours (if you can wait that long).

Thanks for stopping by my kitchen today.  Have fun making ice cream.  I have been making homemade ice cream for so long that I really can just walk by all that processed stuff in the freezer section. It just doesn’t taste REAL.  It tastes sweet, yes, and cold, and sometimes there’s something gooey running through it, and, on the whole, store bought ice cream  has good mouth feel and texture and creaminess, but no TASTE.

16 Jun 2010 Blackberry Sorbet

I’ve been having so much fun with my ice cream makers. I hope you’ve bought one. Remember that double freezer one I told you about at Costco? SUCH a deal! Get one now so you can make stuff like this blackberry sorbet, which tastes even better than fresh blackberries. It’s so RICH, sooo fruity…, icy, refreshing, delicious…, fabulous!! I am eating the photo shoot sorbet as I type this…! You just can’t buy food like this; the stabilizers, preservatives, thickeners, gums, artificial colors, and so o,,n dull the pure, honest, wonderful taste of real food.

It’s easy to make, too, just be sure you have enough time to chill everything completely before putting it in the ice cream machine.

Blackberry Sorbet

1 1/4 cups sugar
1 cup water
1 1/2 lbs fresh blackberries (3-4 baskets)
2 Tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice (juice from one lemon)

Bring sugar and water to a boil. Stir until sugar dissolves, then boil syrup for an additional 3 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool (about 3 hours). Puree blackberries and cooled syrup in blender until smooth. Strain into a 4 cup measuring jug or bowl. Discard the seeds and pulp. Stir lemon juice into the sugar-water-juice mixture. Chill until cold. Process cold mixture in an ice cream maker until very thick and slushy, about 20 minutes. Remove to a covered freezer container. Freeze until firm. This can be made one week ahead. Keep frozen until ready to serve.

10 Jun 2010 Mocha Ice Cream

The clear winner in the most recent ice cream taste test extravaganza? Mocha. It’s creamy. It’s chocolatey. It has a coffee underflavor (is that a word? hrmm, I don’t think so but it should be!), but the coffee flavor doesn’t trump the chocolate flavor. This ice cream was a favorite with the triathlon ladies, the teenagers, the over 50 crowd–and it was even a favorite of two non-coffee drinkers! The original recipe was found at The Pioneer Woman’s Tasty Kitchen site. I adapted that recipe for use in a Cuisinart Ice Cream maker (did you get yours from Costco yet? Go on, go get it…, you’ll use it all summer!).

Mocha Ice Cream

2 cups Half-and-half
4 ounces Espresso or very strong coffee (just make sure it’s not bitter), cooled
1 cup Whipping Cream
1 can (14 oz. Can) Sweetened Condensed Milk
1 cup Hershey’s Chocolate Syrup (1/2 a can)

Optional toppings:

Crushed Heath Bars
More chocolate syrup
Whipped cream

Mix all ingredients together in a large mixing bowl. Refrigerate this mixture for 2 -4 hours until mixture is very cold (or put in freezer for 20 minutes to chill). Pour into electric ice cream freezer/machine and freeze according to manufacturer’s instructions. Remove slushy ice cream to a bowl and freeze until firm. Serve with chocolate syrup, heath bars pieces and whipped cream.

Variations:

Mint Mocha:  add a teaspoon of mint extract to the mix before refrigeration. To serve, sprinkle with chopped Andes Mint pieces.

Mocha Chip:  add mini chocolate chips, or chopped chocolate, to slushy ice cream just before putting into the freezer.

Java Chip:  add some crushed coffee beans to slushy ice cream just before putting into freezer.